the itjerk

my adventures with technology

Tag Archives: windows

wireless display

Every since I found out my Surface Go wasn’t Windows 11 capable, I started to plot ways to get rid of it. Well, not any more. It can function as a Wireless Display for my desktop computer! Now that I’ve started working on The Strawberry Bricks Companion, I found the need for a second display as my main monitor is filled with Adobe InDesign. A quick google search and I found that the Surface is indeed able to function as a wireless display, and here’s how:

First step is to enable the wireless display feature set for Windows on the Surface. Go to Apps>Optional Features and then search for “wireless display” and install. Next on the Surface, open Windows settings and go to Projecting to this PC. There, enable the first option to “Available Everywhere” and turn power source off. (You can adjust the specific settings as you wish, these worked for me.) That’s it for the Surface. To connect to the Surface from my desktop, I just go to Settings> Displays, find the Multiple Display option and click connect! Viola! I have two displays.

Now you may be asking, why don’t you have two monitors? Well, my original Scan Design computer desk from the late 80s isn’t that big, so I opted for one 24″ monitor. Given my eyesight (I have single vision glasses just for computer work), it fits my needs.

new computers

My teenage daughters received new computers this Xmas. The younger one (freshman in high school) got the Surface Laptop Go. It was relatively inexpensive at $540 for a 10th Gen i5, 8GB RAM, 128GB model. I also opted for a Microsoft Complete package that runs $84 for two years. It has a touch screen, touch Windows Hello power button, 12.4″ screen with 1536 x 1024 (148 PPI) resolution. On the disappointing end was that it arrived with Windows 10 2004. After a round of updates, I had to use that Windows 11 Installation Assistant to get to Windows 11. Also disappointing is the 720p camera and lack of lighted keyboard. But for what she’ll be doing, web browsing, watching movies and (hopefully) schoolwork, it was a great solution. I just hope it’s durable.

The older daughter (junior in high school) made the pitch for an Apple MacBook Air, as she didn’t want “some janky-ass Surface computer that I’ll never like”. Fair enough, all of her friends have Apple computers. Ordered on a Tuesday evening, it arrived the next morning at 9:30am in an Apple Store bag, hand delivered to my door (for $9.00 extra). It was a base model, with M1 chip, 8GB RAM and 256GB SSD, costing $899 (with Education pricing). The Air has a superior Retina screen (though without touch capabilities) and a lighted keyboard (good to see that touch bar gone). I also opted for annual Applecare at $70 per year. Kids, right?

Those Dell Latitude 3190s? Not sure if I’ll scrap or sell them, they got some heavy use during the pandemic and you know, kids put stickers all over their laptops! But I did upgrade them to Windows 11 (one required me to turn on TPM in the BIOS) before doing a Reset this PC that (among other things) cleared the TPM before restoring the OS. That’s comforting.

hello windows 11, good-bye surface go?

That cute little Surface Go I purchased a year ago fails the Windows 11 compatibility test. Although it has TPM 2.0, seems the processor is off by ten: I’ve got the Gold 4415Y, but the minimum is Gold 4425Y. The PC Health Check app now says coming soon, so let’s see what’s going on.

WTF, Microsoft, pony up and make your hardware compatible!

byopc 2016, windows edition

I have an upcoming project, formatting the next edition of my progressive rock guide, that requires the use of InDesign. My old Dell PC died earlier this year, and as a stop gap I took the guts of this computer and put it in a new box. I got a copy of Windows 10 Education from the day job, and while it was perfectly fine for doing what I normally do on Windows (finances, work email) at home, it was – no surprise – very sluggish with the Adobe Creative Cloud products. And since this job is a big deal, I didn’t want to be frustrated while working on it.

I looked into buying a Windows computer. The local Microcenter had a few decent Intel Core i5 models for under $500, but to be honest they all were cheap builds and according to reviews loaded with crapware. So I decided to look at parts to byopc. Starting with a 6th generation Skylake Intel Core i5 processor for $180, I started to work backward because although the book job will pay off, I’m cheap! The i3-6100 was less expensive at $109. The major difference between the i5 and the i3 is that the latter only has two actual cores; but for my needs, that’s acceptable, especially considering the savings. I picked up a Gigabyte GA-H110M-S2H motherboard for $29.99, which includes a $30 discount for the processor combo, and 8GB of DDR4 memory to match the board. I also decided to get a SSD drive, the Toshiba OCZ Trion 150 Series for $40, figuring that that SSD would more than make up in performance for the step down in processor.

The total cost for the parts was under $250, and it took about two hours to put the computer together, install Windows and download my applications again. I needed to update the Intel 530 display driver right away because the computer had some trouble coming out of sleep mode. But otherwise the computer is fast, has a fresh install of Windows 10 (Anniversary Edition is now updating), and the old hard drive is still there with all my old files. If I haven’t said this before, Windows 10 is one of Microsoft’s best versions yet. I thoroughly enjoy using it, especially on a quick, modern machine.

Now to get working on that book!

windows update

Did a couple of "clean" installs this week on a few laptops. The XP machine was fortunately imaged at SP2. So that one required SP3 and then an additional 108 high priority updates from Microsoft. The Vista machine required two (2) service packs, and then 99 additional updates from Microsoft. None of this included .Net, Software Optional, Hardware, or Microsoft Office updates, btw…

windows 7

I picked up a copy of Windows 7 Home Premium edition from DigitalRiver. The education special was indeed quite special: $29 for an upgrade edition, with the media costing an extra $13. So, I shrank my hard drive, made a new partition and popped in the Win7 disc. An hour later, I was in business.

The good news? All the hype about Windows 7 seems to be true. It is easier to navigate, it performs flawlessly, and even offered to download new drivers for my Samsung ML-1710 laser printer. I had IIS up and running my ASP/Access site in no time at all, and it runs perfectly fine on my old Dell C521, which is powered by an Athlon X2 4000 and 3GB of RAM. Still can't print from Linux however.

Oh yeah, and don't forget about "God Mode". Just create a folder with the text below and you'll be able to access hundreds of settings!

God Mode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}