the itjerk

my adventures with technology

Category Archives: PC

new dell pc

Recently I searched this website for information about my Windows desktop only to find BYOPC 2016 – is that computer really five years old? Indeed it is, so with little hesitation I set out to find a replacement. Why? Foremost, I believe in a four (4) year replacement cycle for desktop computers. Remember, there’s no badge of honor earned from your janky old computer. Performance, security, safety, peace of mind and your itjerk’s respect all factor in. Second, the computer is not Windows 11 compatible, which as an IT professional will be important for me. Finally, it was an inexpensive build, on the noisy side (cheap case) and low on storage (128GB boot drive). Yet as cheap as it was, it served me well, but now it’s time to move on!

As my primary desktop, it was quite easy for me to arrive at the decision to buy a new computer. Building computers is fun, but good, workable options are just inexpensive. Don’t forget, PC makers spend a lot of time designing well-engineered systems; that’s part of what we pay for. I don’t game, so I have little need for power or anything but a standard configuration, including one that is Windows 11 ready. Now, I haven’t had a Dell computer since the old Dimension C521 in 2007, but my recent experiences with my daughter’s Latitude 3190s (despite initial problems) brought me around again.

A quick trip to Dell.com yielded a Vostro 3681 in a small form-factor case, with 8GB RAM, 256GB M.2 PCIe NVMe Solid State Drive and an Intel 10th Gen i5-10400 processor(6-Core, 12M Cache, 2.9GHz to 4.3GHz) processor, all for $499 (after a $50 coupon code). The HDMI port fits well with my KVM, and it has an extra bay for a spare hard drive. Pandemic-driven built-in bluetooth and wifi card in most desktops (here via a second M2 slot) is handy as well. Plus it’s kinda cute, with that red front bezel.

It arrived quickly (Sat->Wed), and within no time I had an extra 8GB RAM installed, as well as the 128GB drive from my old computer. I signed in with my Microsoft account, and OneDrive did a pretty good job of getting everything in place. I did have to ensure that my Documents and Pictures folders did not connect to OneDrive, as I don’t want them to sync nor be in the Cloud. The perfunctory Windows (shipped with 20H2) and Microsoft Store updates were next, followed by Dell’s System Update. I had previously made a list of the applications I needed, so it was off to the races to download and install them. One thing I realized is that my old Quicken 2007 software is a real relic; getting that now requires an annual subscription, so I’m glad I still had the CD! Once I copied the data from my old drive over, I took it out and plugged in a 1TB “scratch disk” from the old computer that I have a bunch of misc files on. It’s an old SATA drive, so I may replace it with a SSD to keep the “silence” the Vostro 3681 provides.

Update: That 1TB “scratch disk” was actually a 500GB drive, and I did replace it with a 512GB SSD.

Nota Bene: Before you wipe clean your old computer, be sure to give the new computer a run through of your most important tasks. For instance, opening my book InDesign and printing a PDF copy yielded a couple missing fonts (which I had) and a PDF preset (which luckily I found). In other words, don’t be in a hurry to throw out the old!

All in all, it’s a silent, snappy little computer that more than provides for what I need in a desktop environment. Good on you Dell.

One the web:
Dell Vostro

hello windows 11, good-bye surface go?

That cute little Surface Go I purchased a year ago fails the Windows 11 compatibility test. Although it has TPM 2.0, seems the processor is off by ten: I’ve got the Gold 4415Y, but the minimum is Gold 4425Y. The PC Health Check app now says coming soon, so let’s see what’s going on.

WTF, Microsoft, pony up and make your hardware compatible!

oh dell you sucked today

I ordered a Dell Latitude 3190 2-in-1 Laptop for my daughter late last week. It was a certified refurbished computer, and with discount was cheap, $240. Now I know, ordering someone else’s problem computer can be a bad idea, but it still has a one (1) year warranty and is …certified!

The short story is that arrived today, DOA. It then took me 45 minutes to get through the service prompts, mostly because the Service Tag had not yet been entered into Dell’s system. After a further wait, Dell offered a motherboard replacement part in 1-2 business day, while a complete return/replacement would take 7-10 days after approval, plus shipping.

Really?  That just sucks Dell.

Update: A new computer arrived two days later, along with a return Fedex label. All was well with that unit, updates galore, but my daughter is quite happy with it…

Update, Update: I decided to purchase a second one, for myself. Placed the order, unit arrived, and it did not work: Windows error SYSTEM SERVICE EXCEPTION stop code, so after another hour on the phone with Dell, I returned it for a refund.

byopc 2018

Come to find that it’s been four years since I last rebuilt my linux box. Should I, or should I not? The old wizard box has lost its door, I’ve been having some issues with freezing lately, but most of all, it feels like it’s time. Or does it? I’m such a Libra!

Keeping my motto of “cheap and low power,” I’m looking at the Intel G4400 processor for a whopping $49 bucks. It’s marginally better than my current G4320, but similarly, the single thread mark is just marginally worse than the more expense i3-8100 (which I used here). It’s a great value, especially considering I can get a less expensive motherboard (Asus H110M A/M.2) that still has VGA, otherwise I’d also have to upgrade my KVM. In any circumstance, I’ll need to upgrade to DDR4 memory, which for 16GB is not cheap either, so I’ll probably stick to 8GB: at $80 it’s the most expensive component in this build. And if I get a new case, I should get a new power supply, and might as well get a new SSD… So that’s a new computer for $315.25 from my local Microcenter.

A big plus is that I also get to do a clean install, which after two LTS upgrades, is exciting, but work:

  • Minimal Base 18.04 LTS
  • Apps (that’s another post)
  • Security: UFW, DNSCrypt, DuckDNS, fixed IP, etc.
  • Music servers: Logitech Media Server, MiniDLNA with Bubblesoft
  • Install LAMP, configure servers:
  • Setup Apache, migrate /var/www & databases
  • What am I forgetting?

Plus, I’ll need to install that new 3TB raid from my old box, and the spdif card, but what the heck to do with all those old data files…

Well of course I got a new computer, what itjerk wouldn’t?

dnscrypt

Domain Name Service (DNS) is the mechanism by where numeric IP addresses become readable domain names; it’s far easier for me to tell you to visit strawberrybricks.com than a bunch of numbers. When you browse the internet, then, the addresses you type or click on go through a DNS search. Typically, your ISP provides this service, or whomever you get your network connection from – however there is an implicit level of trust involved. Who’s to say that yahoo.com for example, is really yahoo.com? What is the DNS server spoofed the reply? Further, any DNS server can collect a wealth of information by recording your DNS requests. Finally, the speed of your browsing is dependent on how quickly these requests are filled.

Both Google (8.8.8.8) and OpenDNS (208.67.222.222) provide free DNS services that are fast and secure, and supposedly do not track your requests. A third service, Quad9 (9.9.9.9) was very recently launched. Your ISP has a lot of information about you. Switching your DNS to one of these providers is simple (just type them in your router, or network connection), and gives some degree of privacy. Every little bit helps?

DNSCrypt goes one further by encrypting all your DNS requests. It’s an easy enough program to install, available for PC, Mac and Linux, and for routers using DD-WRT. On my Ubuntu box, I needed to install libsodium-dev first, and then was most successful installing DNSCrypt-proxy from source by using the old “configure, make, make install” method with version 1.9.5. Then, you can run it with systemd automatically.

On the web:
DNSCrypt

bracket: dropbox vs google drive

If using a Browser, Google Drive wins. If on a local computer, draw.

byopc 2016, windows edition

I have an upcoming project, formatting the next edition of my progressive rock guide, that requires the use of InDesign. My old Dell PC died earlier this year, and as a stop gap I took the guts of this computer and put it in a new box. I got a copy of Windows 10 Education from the day job, and while it was perfectly fine for doing what I normally do on Windows (finances, work email) at home, it was – no surprise – very sluggish with the Adobe Creative Cloud products. And since this job is a big deal, I didn’t want to be frustrated while working on it.

I looked into buying a Windows computer. The local Microcenter had a few decent Intel Core i5 models for under $500, but to be honest they all were cheap builds and according to reviews loaded with crapware. So I decided to look at parts to byopc. Starting with a 6th generation Skylake Intel Core i5 processor for $180, I started to work backward because although the book job will pay off, I’m cheap! The i3-6100 was less expensive at $109. The major difference between the i5 and the i3 is that the latter only has two actual cores; but for my needs, that’s acceptable, especially considering the savings. I picked up a Gigabyte GA-H110M-S2H motherboard for $29.99, which includes a $30 discount for the processor combo, and 8GB of DDR4 memory to match the board. I also decided to get a SSD drive, the Toshiba OCZ Trion 150 Series for $40, figuring that that SSD would more than make up in performance for the step down in processor.

The total cost for the parts was under $250, and it took about two hours to put the computer together, install Windows and download my applications again. I needed to update the Intel 530 display driver right away because the computer had some trouble coming out of sleep mode. But otherwise the computer is fast, has a fresh install of Windows 10 (Anniversary Edition is now updating), and the old hard drive is still there with all my old files. If I haven’t said this before, Windows 10 is one of Microsoft’s best versions yet. I thoroughly enjoy using it, especially on a quick, modern machine.

Now to get working on that book!

lenovo thinkpad edge e430

I ordered a new notebook computer for my wife, a Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E430. Very nice machine, with a 14" non-glare screen at 1366×768, Intel Core i3 processor, the usually bells, and weighs in at just under 5lbs. What I really liked about it was that all the ports are on the sides and front (SD card) of the computer (including a HDMI port) – nothing connects in the back. That's really handy for tight spaces. Another selling point was the "new" keyboard layout, a substantial if different "upgrade" from the ThinkPads of old. The keys have a really nice touch and spacing and layout is great. The computer also has a very nice form factor, light, easy to open up, and pleasant on the hands, though a few more pixels in the screen (size, not density) would have been nice. I choose to upgrade the RAM by running down to my local Microcenter and purchasing a 4GB SO-DIMM (PC3-12800 1600MHz DDR3) for $30; not only was it a lot less than what Lenovo wanted to charge, but it was the SAME Samsung chip that was already installed. How freaky is that?! All-in-all, the laptop cost around $525 with tax and discount, not bad by any means.

I did have an issue when I first tried to update Windows 7 (Home Premium 64 bit). The updates would install, but when I went to reboot to finish, they would revert after getting about 15% done. No worries, a bit of googling found the solution. I first ran a chkdsk /f/r and then rebooted. Then, I ran the updates in order, with a reboot in between each set:

1) Critical updates (about 10 updates)
2) .Net and IE (3 updates)
3) first half the Windows Updates (7 updates)
4) second half of the Windows Updates (6 updates)
5) last Windows update (it was about 1.2 mb in size)

Viola! Only someone in Redmond would know why a perfectly new installation would experience this, or why Windows Update couldn't have figured this out itself, but there you are; it worked, and my wife is now enjoying her new computer, in all its understated glory!

On the web:
Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E430

windows update

Did a couple of "clean" installs this week on a few laptops. The XP machine was fortunately imaged at SP2. So that one required SP3 and then an additional 108 high priority updates from Microsoft. The Vista machine required two (2) service packs, and then 99 additional updates from Microsoft. None of this included .Net, Software Optional, Hardware, or Microsoft Office updates, btw…

windows 7

I picked up a copy of Windows 7 Home Premium edition from DigitalRiver. The education special was indeed quite special: $29 for an upgrade edition, with the media costing an extra $13. So, I shrank my hard drive, made a new partition and popped in the Win7 disc. An hour later, I was in business.

The good news? All the hype about Windows 7 seems to be true. It is easier to navigate, it performs flawlessly, and even offered to download new drivers for my Samsung ML-1710 laser printer. I had IIS up and running my ASP/Access site in no time at all, and it runs perfectly fine on my old Dell C521, which is powered by an Athlon X2 4000 and 3GB of RAM. Still can't print from Linux however.

Oh yeah, and don't forget about "God Mode". Just create a folder with the text below and you'll be able to access hundreds of settings!

God Mode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}