the itjerk

my adventures with technology

Category Archives: Notification

google discovery doesn’t work

One of the most useful features of my Pixel 5 is the “swipe right on the home screen” for my Google Discovery page. I use to find my most favorite pieces of information – box scores and upcoming games on the sports teams I follow. Except it hasn’t lately. The remedy is clunky: Go to Settings>Storage>Other Apps and delete the “clear google search data” for the Google app. Viola, they appear back, but only until the next refresh.

I had this issue a while back, maybe a couple years, and the solution was to remove all the items that I’ve hidden from my Interests. Not this time. In fact, the whole Interests is a little wonky too; sometimes items that I’ve search appear with the option to either follow or block. Only sometimes.

It’s a shame because this really is one of the most useful features of my phone. C’mon Google, listen up!

iphones

Never got around to posting this, but I did buy my teenage daughters each the iPhone 11 for Xmas. The presentation they gave me, while grammatically a nightmare, was mostly compelling. I’ll share below. Good thing we have jobs, because those suckers cost me $1200, plus about $16 per month for insurance.
Google Family Link does NOT work with the iPhone, but I can get them to add their location to my Google Maps. I also set some parent restrictions on their phones with my AppleID.

google hangouts to google chat?

Hey Google, I understand that for whatever reason you are switching Google Hangouts to Google Chat, but please do not forget to transfer the Group Hangouts over. I have one for my family, it’s how we communicate, you know, as a family.

Hangouts was a nice solution for communicating with my wife and our kids. We use it exclusively for intra-family communication. No messages, no texts, no messenger, etc., just Hangouts. So when that green bubble notification comes up, we immediately all know it’s a family matter. In addition to the app, it also sits conveniently at the bottom left of Gmail.

C’mon Google, do the right thing. Convert the Group Hangouts over to Chat!

Edit Jan 27th – Our family hangout appeared in Google Chat under Rooms! thanks Google!

#vote2020

status = vote2020

I’ve been very busy with work. Who knows what kind of shit show November will be, so I’ve been working away upgrading hundreds of computers. Windows 10 feature 2004, and Catalina 10.15.5-7. I’ve also been knocking the old Windows 7s and High Sierras on the head. Remember, there’s no badge of honor in a seven to thirteen year old computer. It’s done, it had a good life. There’s more power in that new iPhone.

Anyway, I’m still here, doing well, being safe, wearing a mask and keeping the social distance as best an itjerk can. Hope you are too. Let’s fix this mess in November #Vote2020 #fu45 #CupOJoe #bidenharris

further down the pandemic road…

I hope everyone is hanging in there, observing social distancing and wearing a mask. Life goes on for the itjerk: work, family, music, technology, cooking… Being safe and register to vote in November. #changewemust

wireguard vpn

On my to-do list for my newly christened Ubuntu box was to install a VPN. I had previously used OpenVPN-AS (Access Server), which is a lite version (two user) of OpenVPN that uses a web interface for most configuration. I also considered using “regular” OpenVPN but to be honest, there’s a fair amount of work in setting up keys, and I didn’t want to use scripts downloaded from github. Enter WireGuard.

Here’s the pitch. “WireGuard® is an extremely simple yet fast and modern VPN that utilizes state-of-the-art cryptography. It aims to be faster, simpler, leaner, and more useful than IPsec (and OpenVPN), while avoiding the massive headache. It intends to be considerably more performant than OpenVPN.” In short, it’s easy to configure, lightweight to use, and it’s already in the Ubuntu 20.04LTS repo.

To install WireGuard, we install the program, create keys, configure the virtual network device (wg0), and then configure the client (Android).

#install WireGuard
$ sudo -i
$ apt update && install wireguard

#generate server keys (these are stored in /etc/wireguard/)
$ umask 077; wg genkey | tee privatekey | wg pubkey > publickey
cat publickey

#configure the WireGuard interface wg0 (leaving peer empty for now)
$ cd /etc/wireguard
$ nano wg0.conf

[Interface]
Address = 192.168.6.1/24
SaveConfig = true
ListenPort = [port]
PrivateKey = [server privatekey]

[Peer]
PublicKey = [client publickey]
Allowed IPs = 192.168.6.2/32

#open port on firewall for WireGuard to listen
$ ufw allow [port]/udp

#enable and start Wireguard server
$ sudo systemctl enable wg-quick@wg0
$ sudo systemctl start wg-quick@wg0
$ sudo systemctl status wg-quick@wg0

#now that the service is started, let’s stop it, and configure our client.
#first we create client (keys we’re not going to save them)
$ sudo systemctl stop wg-quick@wg0
$ wg genkey | (
read privk
echo "android-private-key: $privk"
echo "android-public-key: $(echo "$privk" | wg pubkey)"
)

#edit wg0.conf and enter the publickey for your client, then restart WireGuard
$ sudo systemctl start wg-quick@wg0
$ sudo systemctl start wg-quick@wg0

#now let’s create a config_file for the client.
$ exit
$ cd ~/Desktop
$ nano config_file

[Interface]
#client
PrivateKey = [client privatekey]
Address = 192.168.6.2/24

[Peer]
#server
PublicKey = [server publickey]
AllowedIPs = 192.168.6.0/24
Endpoint = [ip or host name]:[port]
PersistentKeepalive = 15

#save the file and generate a qrcode to scan with your phone
$ qrencode -t utf8 < config_file

That’s it! I installed the WireGuard app on my Pixel phone, selected QR code for the connection and scanned the image, then the app asked me to name my new connection. All set, I connected and viola, I have my own VPN server.

Couple of notes. Pay attention to the IP addresses and masks; they must be exact. You can use whatever port you want for WireGuard to listen, and it works well with DuckDNS dynamic hostname. Multiple peers can be configured as well. The Android app could do a better job “hiding” both keys, but there you are.

On the web:
WireGuard

roon 1.6

Yesterday a big update to Roon came out. It touted integration with Qobuz, an unpronounceable and paid streaming service similar to Tidal, and some enhancements to Roon Radio, for a “personalized radio experience… [that] helps you discover new music by curating great recommendations.”

The only problem is a) I already own a music collection, and b) I could give a f*ck as to what some algorithm thinks I should listen to next. I want Roon to stream and organize the digital music I own. It’s all about metadata, and it’s all about getting that metadata correct.

Straight up: I don’t buy into music services (Spotify, iTunes, Tidal, etc.). They are for people who don’t love music: this notion that they or Roon “can help me listen and find music” is diametrically opposed to my journey with music. It’s unsatisfying and it’s lazy, but most of all, it’s imprecise.

Sidebar: I am from the era of the Record Hunter, when one had to put in the work to get music, and put in even more work to discover new music. I’m not sure if the younger generation has any appreciation of how difficult it was to find things in the pre-internet era. I’m not only talking about crawling through bargain bins, driving miles to find new record stores or visit old favs, or scanning the back of Goldmine for vendor listings; it’s going to record shows on Sunday mornings; sending paper checks in envelopes to vendors that were only an address; waiting weeks for a special order to come in, or something to arrive in the mail; tearing out the Yellow Page listing in a new city and taking the rental car to every store you could hit; have a typed want list that was carried on travels; actually talking to people about music, writing letters to friends and acquaintances about favs, making friends just because of the music you shared in common; just hanging out and listening to music; carrying records to friends house, or school, or wherever because you found something you thought others may like. being heartbroken when a purchase didn’t pan out, because those hard-earned dollars were just that; listening to the radio, because that was what we had!

The sheer joy of finding a golden nugget from my want list, or an unknown gem I’d never heard of before: This was how I fell in love with music.

happy new year

Happy new year, dear reader(s). As I look over the past years’s posts, I am wrapping up my “adventure” ripping my CD collection to disk, the Chumby has been retired (in favor of another Google Home Mini), and I have just about unloaded all the “extra” electronic components in my household. My wife is now the proud owner of a Pixel 3 phone, and all four in the household are with Google Fi, the old Project Fi.

What’s in store for the new year? Computer-wise, I’m fine, but my oldest will be off to high school, so that looks like a laptop purchase. Now that I’ve had Roon for a while, I’ll write a “real” review. Finally, I’ve warned my wife that I want to upgrade my stereo, though the Neat Acoustics dealer in my area went out of business. More from Axpona 2019?

Anyway, thanks for sticking around, there are bound to be some surprises along the way. Here’s to techno-adventures in 2019!

rip logitechmediaserver, squeezebox

sqebay

It is with a touch of sorrow that I have retired both Logitech Media Server and my Squeezebox v3 Network Music Player, and all ancillary programs. Not only was it my gateway into all things Linux, but it was also my introduction to streaming music. The interface remains stuck in the 00s, and my other hardware have eclipsed it; perhaps this is a problem with opensource. The interface does need a major, major refresh. Ultimately, I have just moved on with Roon server. So for all your names, Slimdevices, Slimserver, Squeezeboxserver, Squeezelite, Logitechmediaserver, I loved you all.

Originally purchased in April 2007, I have my Squeezebox up for sale on eBay:

On the web:
eBay