the itjerk

my adventures with technology

new raid1

The linux computer crashed. Upon restart, it wanted a disk check. Fair enough. But then when it rebooted, it went to the recovery console. Uh, oh, something is up. I went to Advanced Options and did a dpkg check, which found a few things to correct before I could reboot back into the GUI. At first I thought the OS drive was bad, but it ends up that the data drive was the one that had the error.

Upon the next reboot, my RAID card gave me a warning, “HDD may be not available. Please contact…” but when I went into the RAID menu, all drives were good. Hmmm. Does the ASMedia really read the disks’ SMART status? Once inside Ubuntu I then checked the SMART status of my drives using smartctl:

sudo smartctl -d sat --all /dev/sdx -H

The OS drive was fine, but the RAID said DISK IS LIKELY TO FAIL SOON, even though the RAID menu reported both disks as fine. While smarctl is very useful, it cannot look inside the ASMedia controller to let me know which disk was failing. Card said fine, OS said not fine. Who do I trust? Ubuntu. Bottom line: SMART is not to be ignored.

First, I immediately did a backup. Success. I then popped down to my local Microcenter and purchased two new (price matched!) 4TB Seagate IronWolf drives and setup a new RAID1. Why? Foremost, all the drives were still working, no data had been lost. So why not start fresh, reset the clock on the drives to Late 2021 and gain an extra TB of space?

It’s just a lot of time to complete a restore, but everything is safe again.

new macbooks – overspec’d is overserved

They’re in the store, those shiny new Apple MacBook Pros with the M1 Pro and M1 MAX chips, 10 Core CPUs, up to 32 Core GPUs, up to 64 GBs RAM and 8TB SSD. Go big, Apple hopes, so your $2500 laptop will end up costing $5000! With the iPhone’s 16-core Neural Engine too for all those pictures you’ll be taking with your laptop!

Look how easy it is to add an extra grand or two to a machine? Apple consumers are sheep! Apple Marketing FTW!

vaccines that changed our lives

Vaccines that changed your life: 1796 smallpox. 1885 rabies. 1890 tetanus. 1896 typhoid fever. 1906 TB. 1923 diphtheria. 1926 whooping cough. 1932 yellow fever. 1937 flu. 1952 polio. 1963 measles. 1967 mumps. 1969 rubella. 1974 chickenpox. 2021 covid-19.

google discovery doesn’t work

One of the most useful features of my Pixel 5 is the “swipe right on the home screen” for my Google Discovery page. I use to find my most favorite pieces of information – box scores and upcoming games on the sports teams I follow. Except it hasn’t lately. The remedy is clunky: Go to Settings>Storage>Other Apps and delete the “clear google search data” for the Google app. Viola, they appear back, but only until the next refresh.

I had this issue a while back, maybe a couple years, and the solution was to remove all the items that I’ve hidden from my Interests. Not this time. In fact, the whole Interests is a little wonky too; sometimes items that I’ve search appear with the option to either follow or block. Only sometimes.

It’s a shame because this really is one of the most useful features of my phone. C’mon Google, listen up!

new dell pc

Recently I searched this website for information about my Windows desktop only to find BYOPC 2016 – is that computer really five years old? Indeed it is, so with little hesitation I set out to find a replacement. Why? Foremost, I believe in a four (4) year replacement cycle for desktop computers. Remember, there’s no badge of honor earned from your janky old computer. Performance, security, safety, peace of mind and your itjerk’s respect all factor in. Second, the computer is not Windows 11 compatible, which as an IT professional will be important for me. Finally, it was an inexpensive build, on the noisy side (cheap case) and low on storage (128GB boot drive). Yet as cheap as it was, it served me well, but now it’s time to move on!

As my primary desktop, it was quite easy for me to arrive at the decision to buy a new computer. Building computers is fun, but good, workable options are just inexpensive. Don’t forget, PC makers spend a lot of time designing well-engineered systems; that’s part of what we pay for. I don’t game, so I have little need for power or anything but a standard configuration, including one that is Windows 11 ready. Now, I haven’t had a Dell computer since the old Dimension C521 in 2007, but my recent experiences with my daughter’s Latitude 3190s (despite initial problems) brought me around again.

A quick trip to Dell.com yielded a Vostro 3681 in a small form-factor case, with 8GB RAM, 256GB M.2 PCIe NVMe Solid State Drive and an Intel 10th Gen i5-10400 processor(6-Core, 12M Cache, 2.9GHz to 4.3GHz) processor, all for $499 (after a $50 coupon code). The HDMI port fits well with my KVM, and it has an extra bay for a spare hard drive. Pandemic-driven built-in bluetooth and wifi card in most desktops (here via a second M2 slot) is handy as well. Plus it’s kinda cute, with that red front bezel.

It arrived quickly (Sat->Wed), and within no time I had an extra 8GB RAM installed, as well as the 128GB drive from my old computer. I signed in with my Microsoft account, and OneDrive did a pretty good job of getting everything in place. I did have to ensure that my Documents and Pictures folders did not connect to OneDrive, as I don’t want them to sync nor be in the Cloud. The perfunctory Windows (shipped with 20H2) and Microsoft Store updates were next, followed by Dell’s System Update. I had previously made a list of the applications I needed, so it was off to the races to download and install them. One thing I realized is that my old Quicken 2007 software is a real relic; getting that now requires an annual subscription, so I’m glad I still had the CD! Once I copied the data from my old drive over, I took it out and plugged in a 1TB “scratch disk” from the old computer that I have a bunch of misc files on. It’s an old SATA drive, so I may replace it with a SSD to keep the “silence” the Vostro 3681 provides.

Update: That 1TB “scratch disk” was actually a 500GB drive, and I did replace it with a 512GB SSD.

Nota Bene: Before you wipe clean your old computer, be sure to give the new computer a run through of your most important tasks. For instance, opening my book InDesign and printing a PDF copy yielded a couple missing fonts (which I had) and a PDF preset (which luckily I found). In other words, don’t be in a hurry to throw out the old!

All in all, it’s a silent, snappy little computer that more than provides for what I need in a desktop environment. Good on you Dell.

One the web:
Dell Vostro

data saver? unlimited data?

Now that things are getting back to normal in the post-Covid world, I noticed my family’s data usage spiking. I guess I could just switch to one of Google Fi’s unlimited plans, but where’s the fun in that?

Turn on Data Saver for Android by swiping down, go to the second panel and then press and hold Data Saver. There are two apps that request Unlimited Data, but I only allow Carrier Services.

Facebook and Instagram are hogs, but if you go to Facebook’s Settings & Privacy, there’s a Cellular Data Usage item that you can crank down video usage and limit auto playback to Wifi only. Messenger also has a Data Saver under your account. Instagram hides it under Settings>Account, where you’ll find Cellular Data Use. You can turn on Data Saver and limit high resolution to Wifi only. Twitter has its Data Saver under Settings>General. Lots of options.

Reality check: I have two teenage daughters that live on their phones, are addicted to Snapchat and Tik-Tok, so yes, an unlimited plan is in my very near future. Google Fi as some pretty reasonable options, as below.

On the web:
Google Fi

hello windows 11, good-bye surface go?

That cute little Surface Go I purchased a year ago fails the Windows 11 compatibility test. Although it has TPM 2.0, seems the processor is off by ten: I’ve got the Gold 4415Y, but the minimum is Gold 4425Y. The PC Health Check app now says coming soon, so let’s see what’s going on.

WTF, Microsoft, pony up and make your hardware compatible!

iphones

Never got around to posting this, but I did buy my teenage daughters each the iPhone 11 for Xmas. The presentation they gave me, while grammatically a nightmare, was mostly compelling. I’ll share below. Good thing we have jobs, because those suckers cost me $1200, plus about $16 per month for insurance.
Google Family Link does NOT work with the iPhone, but I can get them to add their location to my Google Maps. I also set some parent restrictions on their phones with my AppleID.

roon 1.8

Five emails from Roon Labs announcing their latest version, 1.8. Take a look below, that’s the home screen. Seriously. A big “one step back.” No additional features, a horrible UI and UX that’s shaky. Is Roon becoming nothing but a frontend for streaming services? Well, like any other old component in the rack, it’s time to look for the next one and upgrade.

google hangouts to google chat?

Hey Google, I understand that for whatever reason you are switching Google Hangouts to Google Chat, but please do not forget to transfer the Group Hangouts over. I have one for my family, it’s how we communicate, you know, as a family.

Hangouts was a nice solution for communicating with my wife and our kids. We use it exclusively for intra-family communication. No messages, no texts, no messenger, etc., just Hangouts. So when that green bubble notification comes up, we immediately all know it’s a family matter. In addition to the app, it also sits conveniently at the bottom left of Gmail.

C’mon Google, do the right thing. Convert the Group Hangouts over to Chat!

Edit Jan 27th – Our family hangout appeared in Google Chat under Rooms! thanks Google!