the itjerk

my adventures with technology

Monthly Archives: March 2015

squeeze2upnp + beep = lms

Screenshot from 2015-03-11 18-56-42

Logitech Media Server (LMS), the old Squeezebox Server or Slimserver, is my go-to for playing my music library on hard disk. I use a Squeezebox v3, various Raspberry Pi’s, and now with the help of this nice little program, my Beep. Squeeze2upnp (sq2u) is as it says, “a bridge between LMS and uPNP devices”. It translates LMS instructions for UPnP devices. More simply, it makes my Beep appear as a playback device in any LMS app or webpage.

You can download Squeeze2upnp below, it’s precompiled for Linux and Windows. There’s instructions in the user guide on how to set it up and get it running. Make sure your Beep is playing while Squeeze2upnp is in “discovery” mode, and be sure to daemonize it with the “-z” option, otherwise CPU usage goes through the roof. You will also have to edit the config.xml file to support FLAC playback. Also, you may have to monkey with your firewall, I’m not sure what ports it uses, but it caused an issue for me. (more later).

to discover UPnP devices on local subnet and configure sq2u to play them:
./squeeze2upnp-x86 -i config.xml
to daemonize sq2u:
./squeeze2upnp-x86 -z

That’s it, give it a few minutes and your UPnp device will appear
Big shout out to philippe44 for his active development of the Squeeze2upnp program. I had an issue with it crashing, sent him a debug file, and all is now well. That’s the beauty of FOSS.

Update: philippe44 is currently working on a third-party plug-in for LMS that automates discovery and playback to your Beep inside the LMS interface. Check out the thread above at slimdevices.com for more info.

On the web
https://github.com/philippe44/LMS-to-uPnP

att giving me the hard sell

AT&T is pushing U-Verse in my area, using the hard sell tactic:
“… if we don’t hear from you before 4/25/15, your service maybe temporarily interrupted”.
Of course, there’s nothing more I look forward to more than talking to a sales rep on a phone, and having someone install new equipment in my home.

this one’s going to the ICC

2996_001

this is beep

Just before the holidays I received Beep, a $99 music streaming device. It’s a very simple thing, whose purpose is to provide wireless streaming capability to dumb systems, like a pair of powered speakers, stereo system, boom box, well, just about anything that has an audio input that accepts either 3.5mm analog or digital optical output. I especially like that last part, digital. The Beep runs on 5VDC, sports a metallic finish and consists of a large multifunction knob (start/pause/skip/stop/volume) and some cool flashing lights.

It’s controlled by an app, available on either Android or iOS, that also helps you setup the player on your network. When I first got it, Beep was pretty limited. I could play either Spotify or Pandora, or in my case, neither (because I don’t use either service), though it now also supports SomaFM radio. Okay, it’s still pretty limited. No support for Google Play, Amazon Music, that iTunes thingy, etc.
Screenshot_2015-03-09-17-01-40
Recently however, Beep have added support for DLNA music servers. This is great news, because I can now play all the music on my local media server via the Beep. In order for me to do so, I first installed MiniDLNA software on my Ubuntu box using apt-get, manually edited the config file to get it setup, and opened a few ports in my computer’s firewall, 8200 TCP and 1900 UDP to let MiniDLNA out. It would have been easier if the Beep would just connect to my Squeezebox Server (aka LMS), but it’s just not there, yet…

It would also be better if Beep were a little more stable, and transparent. Throughout the day it randomly lights up “smiley face” (looking for network connection) and “sun shining” (all lights glowing, who knows what this means). That’s ultimately going to be the hard sell on Beep: without a display, no one wants to decode blinking lights; what’s it doing? why is it doing that? It just needs to work.

To use Beep as a renderer (something that plays media from a DLNA server), I had to get another Android app, BubbleUPnP. It’s a fairly straight forward app, though I did have to install the “demo server” in order for it to find my MiniDLNA server. Not sure if this is me or the app, but it was not very intuitive to figure out. That done, however, I can stream my server’s music library to whatever I connect my Beep to.
Screenshot_2015-03-09-16-50-06

On the web:
Beep | Bringing music to every room in your home
MiniDLNA
BubbleUPnP Server